About Listeria

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Listeria and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

Outbreaks

Tyson Chicken Listeria Outbreak

As of July 9, 2021, details of this recall were updated to reflect additional date codes and an increase in product poundage from approximately 8,492,832 pounds to approximately 8,955,296 pounds. The recalled product names and product codes remain the same. While the product was distributed to schools, it resulted from a commercial sale and was not part of food provided by the USDA for the National School Lunch Program.


Illnesses linked in Texas and Delaware – thus far.

Tyson Foods Inc., a Dexter, Mo. establishment, is recalling approximately 8,492,832 pounds of ready-to-eat (RTE) chicken products that may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The frozen, fully cooked chicken products were produced between December 26, 2020 and April 13, 2021. The products that are subject to recall are listed here. View the labels here.

The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. P-7089” on the product bag or inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped nationwide to retailers and institutions, including hospitals, nursing facilities, restaurants, schools and Department of Defense locations.

As of July 2, 2021, three people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from Delaware and Texas. Illnesses started on dates ranging from April 6, 2021, to June 5, 2021.

Sick people range in age from 60 to 95 years, with a median age of 89, and 66% are male. All three people were hospitalized, and one death has been reported from Texas.

The true number of sick people in an outbreak is likely higher than the number reported, and the outbreak may not be limited to the states with known illnesses. This is because some people recover without medical care and are not tested for Listeria. In addition, recent illnesses may not yet be reported as it usually takes 3 to 4 weeks to determine if a sick person is part of an outbreak.

State and local public health officials interviewed people about the foods they ate in the month before they got sick. All three people were in a long-term care facility or hospital when they got sick. These facilities served many food items, including meals with precooked chicken.

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